Martin Fendt

Martin
Fendt
Articles
Global Sourcing

Faced with demand for global flexibility, carriers are looking constantly for adaptable and cost-effective ways to ensure that passengers experience the same recognized airline brand and associated level of quality service they expect no matter where in the world they embark or disembark. Behind the scenes, carriers are equally keen to ensure that aircraft are maintained at the same level of operational readiness as they would be back at the home base.

Raising the Power Bar 

WHEN AIRBUS ANNOUNCED THE A350 XWB featuring a completely new wing and wider fuselage made with carbon fiber, engineers at Airbus, Thales and Honeywell no doubt were eager to turn their talents to the cockpit and avionics and improve upon the A330 and A380 configurations proposed for earlier A350 studies. Judging from the resultant transformation, they must have taken a good, hard look at the 787's futuristic cockpit and integrated avionics and avidly set themselves the goal of not only meeting but exceeding this state of the art.

Airbus predicts doubling of world airliner fleet by 2026 

Airbus COO-Customers John Leahy predicted yesterday that the world's airlines will require 24,300 new aircraft worth $2.6 trillion between now and 2026 in order to support retirements and annual passenger traffic growth of 4.9% per year. Approximately 900 of the new aircraft will be freighters, valued at $200 billion.

Air Transport World

Read the best-read publication for the global airline management community: ATW magazine. View individual articles or download a digital issue (subscription required).  

ATW On-Location

Click here to read event news from ATW On-Location

Blogs & Commentary
Jun 20, 2018
blog

Child border policy brings US airlines into political fray

The scandal over children being separated from their parents by US border officials at the US-Mexico border has drawn some of America’s largest airlines into the political debate....More
Jun 11, 2018
blog

IATA’s other imbalance is the lack of LCCs

IATA’s board chairman, Akbar al Baker, created a lot of controversy last week when he ended the IATA AGM in Sydney by telling reporters that “only a man” could run an airline (for which he later apologized). This followed a media stir when IATA issued a photograph of its board members, comprising 25 men and just one woman. But gender inequality is not the only imbalance in IATA’s ranks....More
May 21, 2018
blog

Was Doug Parker’s $5 billion ‘average’ earnings prediction a mistake?

American’s first two annual financial results following Parker’s $3 billion-$7 billion assertion will end up at the low end of the range....More

We use cookies to improve your website experience. To learn about our use of cookies and how you can manage your cookie settings, please see our Cookie Policy. By continuing to use the website, you consent to our use of cookies.