J.A. Donoghue

J.A.
Donoghue
Articles
A New Kind of Normal 

Saying that the airline industry's fortunes will improve somewhat in 2005 is overly optimistic for some carriers while being a bit too dark for others. Yet, on average that's what the year will bring...unless.

The fan is the thing 

Driven by stringent noise targets, the designs of the two engines for the A380 are remarkable not only for the size of their fans in relationship to thrust produced but also for the very shape of the fan blades. No longer straight shafts of metal, these blades swoop and turn with a sinuous grace that looks, well, sort of sexy--or maybe that judgment is just the consequence of staring at too many engines in a full-frontal sort of way.

Lost in the Taxi 

Aircraft position information is essential for safe operations, including the parts that happen on the ground. While this ground piece has not been ignored, it is true that until recently it was not afforded attention equal to the flying piece. Consequently, increasingly congested facilities experienced a rapid rise in aircraft and vehicles getting lost on airports or going where they shouldn't go. The rate of runway incursions began to rise, and the rate of increase in the US was well beyond alarming (ATW, 9/03, p. 38).

Maturity Sighted, Then Lost 

Airlines in 1964 were very excited about technology. The industry that had been pushing the limits of piston engines and propellers since the 1930s recently had been presented with the greatest gift imaginable-a deus ex machina if there ever was one-the jet airplane.

Showing the way 

In the early 1960s there still remained in service a few of the A/N radio ranges that in the 1930s first brought electronic navigation to the aviation community, rudimentary devices that gave precise guidance on just four courses to and from the station. But in 1964 the transition was nearly complete to a new system of navigation based mostly on VOR (VHF Omni Range) and DME (Distance Measuring Equipment) stations for overland en route navigation and ILS (Instrument Landing System) for precision approaches.

Focus on Efficiency 

Unambiguous in the products it provides, Airbus Training offers its customers something those customers don't always want: The most efficient way to fly Airbus aircraft.

FlightSafety Boeing = Alteon 

While most of the aviation world was strapping down the lid of the cash chest as tightly as possible, Boeing decided last year that it so believed in the future of flight training that it spent hundreds of millions of dollars to ensure its position in the market. Locking in its control of FlightSafety Boeing Training International, Boeing bought out its partner last year and just last month announced that the company's name will be changed to Alteon later this year.

ATWOnline Marketplace - Buy a Link Now
ATW On-Location

View all ATW On-Location